Placement Positions

Examples of LVC Positions

More about these examples of LVC positions
Each year, Lutheran Volunteer Corps matches 90-95 full time Volunteers with social justice non-profit organizations across the U.S. This directory provides an overview of placement positions for the 2015-16 and 2016-17 program years.  About 80% of LVC partner placement organizations re-apply each year and we also have new positions each year that may not yet be on this list.

LVC Applicants see available positions as part of the application and matching process, including more in depth position descriptions. To have the widest choice of positions, apply by our Round 1 January 15th deadline. There are significantly fewer positions available for the Round 2 April 1st deadline. Please contact recruitment@lutheranvolunteercorps.org if you have particular questions about available positions.

Co-Teacher – Shalom High School-Transcenter for Youth

Co-Teacher – Shalom High School-Transcenter for Youth
Shalom High School was founded in 1973 with the specific purpose of educating young people returning from correctional institutions. Over the years, the school's mission evolved to educate any student who found academic achievement difficult in traditional high schools. Today, these student are called ''at-risk''. After successful completion of Shalom's academic program, students receive high school diplomas.

The mission of Shalom High School is to allow at-risk students an opportunity to earn high school diplomas and to prepare students to be productive, successful adults; good citizens and to become responsible mature members of their communities. The Luther volunteer serves as a co-teacher, a mentor/advisor to our students and will also coordinate various student activities. Good basic academic skills and the ability to work with at-risk, urban students and a diverse staff.

Shalom High School was funded in 1973 with the specific purpose of educating young people returning from correctional institutions Over the years, the school's missions evolved to educate any student who found academic achievement difficult in traditional high schools. Today, these students are called ''at-risk''. After successful completion of Shalom's academic program, and the Milwaukee Public Schools graduation requirements, students receive high school diplomas.

Good basic academic skill, the ability to listen and empathize, flexibility, adaptability, creativity and the willingness to share their inherent gifts with our students is a basic summary of skills needed for the position. The ability to develop relationships with urban predominately African-American students is also necessary.

Milwaukee WI